Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Zoonosis Home Care

Home care for an arbovirus infection includes:

Zoonosis Pain and Fever Adults

Medications commonly used to control pain and fever in adults with an arbovirus infection include:

  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Adult dosing is 2 regular strength (325 mg) every 4 hours or 2 extra-strength (500 mg) every 6 hours.
  • Maximum dose is 4,000 mg per day.
  • Avoid this drug if you have alcoholism, liver disease or an allergy to the drug. See the package instructions.
  • Common brand names include Tylenol, Panadol, and many others.





NSAID Precautions

Zoonosis Pain and Fever Children

Common medications used at home for pain and fever in children with an arbovirus infection include:

Aspirin and most of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are not used in children except under a doctor's care.

  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Dosing is 10-15 mg per kilogram (5-7 mg per pound) of body weight every 4-6 hours, up to the adult dose.
  • Do not exceed the maximum daily dose.
  • Acetaminophen products come in various strengths. Always follow the package instructions.
  • Avoid this drug in children with liver disease or an allergy to acetaminophen.
  • Common acetaminophen products include Tylenol, Panadol and many others.



Zoonosis Warning Signs

Notify your doctor if you have an arbovirus infection and any of the following:

Continue to Zoonosis Prevention

Last Updated: Nov 30, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Zoonosis References
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  2. Drosten C, Gottig S, Schilling S, Asper M, Panning M, Schmitz H, Gunther S. Rapid detection and quantification of RNA of Ebola and Marburg viruses, Lassa virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, dengue virus, and yellow fever virus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Jul;40(7):2323-30. [12089242]
  3. Dumpis U, Crook D, Oksi J. Tick-borne encephalitis. Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Apr;28(4):882-90. [10825054]
  4. Isturiz RE, Gubler DJ, Brea del Castillo J. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Latin America and the Caribbean. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2000 Mar;14(1):121-40, ix. [10738676]
  5. Whitley RJ, Gnann JW. Viral encephalitis: familiar infections and emerging pathogens. Lancet. 2002 Feb 9;359(9305):507-13. [11853816]
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