Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Wound Puncture Incidence

Facts about puncture wounds:

  • Puncture wounds are very common.
  • The most common locations for puncture wounds are the hands and feet.
  • Puncture wounds have a higher risk for infection than abrasions and lacerations.

Continue to Wound Puncture Symptoms

Last Updated: Jul 3, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Wound Puncture References
  1. Baldwin G, Colbourne M. Puncture wounds. Pediatr Rev. 1999 Jan;20(1):21-3. [9919048]
  2. Harrison M, Thomas M. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Antibiotics after puncture wounds to the foot. Emerg Med J. 2002 Jan;19(1):49. [11777876]
  3. Haverstock BD, Grossman JP. Puncture wounds of the foot. Evaluation and treatment. Clin Podiatr Med Surg. 1999 Oct;16(4):583-96. [10553222]
  4. Laughlin TJ, Armstrong DG, Caporusso J, Lavery LA. Soft tissue and bone infections from puncture wounds in children. West J Med. 1997 Feb;166(2):126-8. [9109329]
  5. Lavery LA, Walker SC, Harkless LB, Felder-Johnson K. Infected puncture wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic adults. Diabetes Care. 1995 Dec;18(12):1588-91. [8722056]
  6. Weber EJ. Plantar puncture wounds: a survey to determine the incidence of infection. J Accid Emerg Med. 1996 Jul;13(4):274-7. [8832349]
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