Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment hair systems specialist surgery hair flaps hair transplant scalp lift scalp reduction tunnel grafts Home Care warning signs Underlying Cause non-scarring alopecia scarring alopecia

Thinning Hair Underlying Cause

The most common cause for alopecia is male pattern baldness, which can also occur in females.

Additional causes of alopecia include:

Thinning Hair Non-Scarring Alopecia

Non-scarring alopecia refers to a situation where the hair shafts fall out, but the hair follicles are still alive.

Types of non-scarring alopecia include:

  • Alopecia areata: causes patchy, temporary hair loss
  • Drug side effects: usually temporary
  • Male pattern baldness: inherited form of baldness that affects males and females
  • Traction alopecia: tension on the hair strands from tight head wraps and pony tails
  • Tinea capitis: a fungal infection

Thinning Hair Scarring Alopecia

Scarring alopecia is caused by inflammation, scarring, and destruction of hair follicles.

This form of hair loss can accompany other illnesses and tends to be permanent.

Types of scarring alopecia include:

Last Updated: Jan 21, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Thinning Hair References
  1. Lenane P, Pope E, Krafchik B. Congenital alopecia areata. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Feb;52(2 Suppl 1):8-11. [15692503]
  2. Ross EK, Shapiro J. Management of hair loss. Dermatol Clin. 2005 Apr;23(2):227-43. [15837153]
  3. Trueb RM; Swiss Trichology Study Group. Finasteride treatment of patterned hair loss in normoandrogenic postmenopausal women. Dermatology. 2004;209(3):202-7. [15459533]
  4. Wiedemeyeer K, Schill WB, LOser C. Diseases on hair follicles leading to hair loss part I: nonscarring alopecias. Skinmed. 2004 Jul-Aug;3(4):209-14. [15249781]
  5. Wiedemeyer K, Schill WB, Loser C. Diseases on hair follicles leading to hair loss part II: scarring alopecias. Skinmed. 2004 Sep-Oct;3(5):266-9. [15365263]
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