Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Testicular Injury Anatomy

To better understand testicular injury, it helps to understand the anatomy of the scrotum and testicles.

The scrotum is a sac of skin that contains two testicles, which produce sperm. Next to each testicle lie the epididymis, vas deferens, and spermatic cord. The scrotum also contains blood vessels and fat.

Each testicle receives its blood supply through the spermatic cord. A blocked spermatic cord cuts off the blood supply to the testicle.

The epididymis is a thin, folded, tube that is about 15 feet long. The epididymis receives sperm from the testicle in the scrotum. The sperm mature as they pass through the epididymis. The epididymis ends in the vas deferens, through which sperm pass to the prostate gland.

Male genital anatomy:

  • Testicle
  • Inguinal canal and scrotum
  • Prostate, testes, and penis
  • Prostate and bladder
  • Locations where lymph node swelling can be felt

Last Updated: Nov 4, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Testicular Injury References
  1. Buckley JC, McAninch JW. Use of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of testicular injuries in blunt scrotal trauma. J Urol. 2006 Jan;175(1):175-8. [16406902]
  2. Cass AS, Ferrara L, Wolpert J, Lee J. Bilateral testicular injury from external trauma. J Urol. 1988 Dec;140(6):1435-6. [3193512]
  3. Micallef M, Ahmad I, Ramesh N, Hurley M, McInerney D. Ultrasound features of blunt testicular injury. Injury. 2001 Jan;32(1):23-6. [11164397]
  4. Pace A, Powell C. Testicular infarction and rupture after blunt trauma--use of diagnostic ultrasound. ScientificWorldJournal. 2004 Jun 14;4:437-41. [15258668]
  5. Wan J, Corvino TF, Greenfield SP, DiScala C. Kidney and testicle injuries in team and individual sports: data from the national pediatric trauma registry. J Urol. 2003 Oct;170(4 Pt 2):1528-3; discussion 1531-2. [14501652]
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