Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Tendinitis of the Kneecap Using a Walker

Elderly patients with patellar tendinitis may require more support than a cane or crutches can offer.

Some people may require more support than a cane or crutches can offer. A walker is much more stable than crutches or a cane. A walker allows you to keep weight off one leg while you walk. It is also lends support if both of your legs are unstable or painful.

The handles of your walker should reach the crease in your wrist when you stand upright and the walker is placed on the floor. Moving slowly is important when you use a walker.

Using a Walker

  • Place your walker one stride ahead of you. Make sure that all 4 legs of your walker are on the ground.
  • Grasp the handles on the walker with both hands. Lean forward and support your weight on your arms.
  • Step forward with your good leg. Place your foot in the center of the square that is made by the walker feet.
  • Step forward with the bad leg.

Walker Rules
  • Take small steps when you turn.
  • In order to sit in a chair, back up until your legs touch the chair. Reach behind you in order to feel the seat and then sit down.
  • In order to get up from a chair, push yourself up with your arms and then grasp the handles on the walker.
  • Make sure that the rubber tips on the legs of the walker are tightly fastened. Replace the rubber tips if they become worn.
  • Do not use your walker to climb stairs.
  • Do not use your walker on an escalator.

General Safety Tips
  • Remove small area rugs, electrical cords, spilled liquids or other items that may cause you to slip.
  • In the bathroom, install non-slip bath mats, toilet grab bars, a raised toilet seat, shower grab bars, and a shower tub seat.
  • Keep needed household items in close reach. Store less used items out of the way.
  • Use a backpack, fanny pack, apron or briefcase in order to carry items.

Continue to Tendinitis of the Kneecap Using Crutches

Last Updated: Nov 6, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Tendinitis of the Kneecap References
  1. Bailey MP, Maillardet FJ, Messenger N. Kinematics of cycling in relation to anterior knee pain and patellar tendinitis. J Sports Sci. 2003 Aug;21(8):649-57. [12875315]
  2. Bennett R. Addressing musculoskeletal pain. Geriatrics. 2004 Aug;59(8):11-2. [15332411]
  3. Richards DP, Ajemian SV, Wiley JP, Zernicke RF. Knee joint dynamics predict patellar tendinitis in elite volleyball players. Am J Sports Med. 1996 Sep-Oct;24(5):676-83. [8883692]
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