Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Swine Flu Prevention

Prevention of swine flu includes:

  • Influenza vaccine
    • Currently protects against common seasonal strains, but not H1N1 (swine flu)
    • An H1N1 vaccine should be available for the 2009-2010 flu season
  • Avoid exposure to the influenza virus:
    • Avoid close contact with anyone who has influenza.
    • Avoid large groups of people.
    • Do not share cups or eating utensils.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.
    • Wash your hands -- with soap and warm water -- that you wash for 15 to 20 seconds.
    • Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
    • Avoid touching nose and mouth.
    • Wear a mask with an N95 rating if you have influenza.
    • Avoid travel during epidemic.
    • Stay home if you are sick for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer. This is to keep from infecting others and spreading the virus further.

Continue to Swine Flu Complications

Last Updated: Jan 5, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Swine Flu References
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infections - Chicago, Illinois, April-July 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 Aug 28;58(33):913-8. [19713879]
  3. Ebell MH, White LL, Casault T. A systematic review of the history and physical examination to diagnose influenza. J Am Board Fam Pract. 2004 Jan-Feb;17(1):1-5. [15014046]
  4., HHS Interagency Public Affairs Group on Influenza Preparedness and Response
  5. Jamieson DJ, Honein MA, Rasmussen SA, Williams JL, Swerdlow DL, Biggerstaff MS, Lindstrom S, Louie JK, Christ CM, Bohm SR, Fonseca VP, Ritger KA, Kuhles DJ, Eggers P, Bruce H, Davidson HA, Lutterloh E, Harris ML, Burke C, Cocoros N, Finelli L, MacFarlane KF, Shu B, Olsen SJ; Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Pregnancy Working Group. H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection during pregnancy in the USA. Lancet. 2009 Aug 8;374(9688):451-8. Epub 2009 Jul 28. [19643469]
  6. Jefferson T, Smith S, Demicheli V, Harnden A, Rivetti A, Di Pietrantonj C. Assessment of the efficacy and effectiveness of influenza vaccines in healthy children: systematic review. Lancet. 2005 Feb 26-Mar 4;365(9461):773-80. [15733718]
  7. Montalto NJ. An office-based approach to influenza: clinical diagnosis and laboratory testing. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Jan 1;67(1):111-8. [12537174]
  8. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Use of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2009. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Aug 28;58(RR-10):1-8. [19713882]
  9. Strategy for Off-Site Rapid Triage(c) (SORT) and Real-time Epidemiological Assessment for Community Health(c) (REACH), Emory University, Principal Investigators: Alexander Isakov, MD, MPH; Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH, Collaboration with the Emory at Grady Health Literacy Team (Ruth Parker, MD; Kara Jacobson, MPH, CHES; Lorenzo DiFrancesco, MD)
  10. VHA Office of Public Health Surveillance and Research; Influenza Algorithm Work Group
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