Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Spinal Cord Injury Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of spinal cord injury.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
    • Will I need surgery?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • Do I need a special exercise program?
  • Will I need physical therapy?
  • Will I need occupational therapy?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Continue to Spinal Cord Injury Specialist

Last Updated: Jul 10, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Spinal Cord Injury References
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  2. Croft AC, Herring P, Freeman MD, Haneline MT. The neck injury criterion: future considerations. Accid Anal Prev. 2002 Mar;34(2):247-55. [11829295]
  3. Hendey GW, Wolfson AB, Mower WR, Hoffman JR; National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study Group. Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality: results of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study in blunt cervical trauma. J Trauma. 2002 Jul;53(1):1-4. [12131380]
  4. Hoffman JR, Wolfson AB, Todd K, Mower WR. Selective cervical spine radiography in blunt trauma: methodology of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS). Ann Emerg Med. 1998 Oct;32(4):461-9. [9774931]
  5. Joslin CC, Khan SN, Bannister GC. Long-term disability after neck injury. a comparative study. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Sep;86(7):1032-4. [15446533]
  6. Kerr D, Bradshaw L, Kelly AM. Implementation of the Canadian C-spine rule reduces cervical spine x-ray rate for alert patients with potential neck injury. J Emerg Med. 2005 Feb;28(2):127-31. [15707805]
  7. McDonald JW, Becker D, Sadowsky CL, Jane JA Sr, Conturo TE, Schultz LM. Late recovery following spinal cord injury. Case report and review of the literature. J Neurosurg. 2002 Sep;97(2 Suppl):252-65. [12296690]
  8. McIntosh AS, McCrory P. Preventing head and neck injury. Br J Sports Med. 2005 Jun;39(6):314-8. Review. [15911597]
  9. North NT. The psychological effects of spinal cord injury: a review. Spinal Cord. 1999 Oct;37(10):671-9. [10557122]
  10. Short DJ, El Masry WS, Jones PW. High dose methylprednisolone in the management of acute spinal cord injury - a systematic review from a clinical perspective. Spinal Cord. 2000 May;38(5):273-86. [10822400]
  11. Smith D, McMurray N, Disler P. Early intervention for acute back injury: can we finally develop an evidence-based approach? Clin Rehabil. 2002 Feb;16(1):1-11. [11837522]
  12. Yasuda S, Wehman P, Targett P, Cifu DX, West M. Return to work after spinal cord injury: a review of recent research. NeuroRehabilitation. 2002;17(3):177-86. [12237497]
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