Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment specialist Home Care pain in adults pain in children warning signs Underlying Cause Anatomy Pathophysiology

Sore Hand Pathophysiology

Hand pain is often due to inflammation of the tendons or cartilage lining the inside of a joint. Cartilage is the smooth, gliding surface inside all joints. Joints are lubricated with a substance known as synovial fluid.

Injuries and arthritis commonly cause hand pain. Multiple injuries or overuse can overload joints and cause inflammation. Arthritis involves inflammation of the cartilage lining the joints.

Persistent joint inflammation will gradually destroy cartilage. This will eventually cause joint damage and chronic pain.

Last Updated: Mar 18, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Sore Hand References
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  2. Helliwell PS. Regional musculoskeletal pain. The elbow, forearm, wrist and hand. Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Jun;13(2):311-28. [10952866]
  3. Palmer KT. Regional musculoskeletal conditions: pain in the forearm, wrist and hand. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2003 Feb;17(1):113-35. [12659824]
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