Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Sickle Cell Trait Treatment

Bone marrow transplant is the only potential cure for sickle cell anemia. This procedure is not commonly performed due to the risks associated with the procedure, and the difficulty in finding a suitable donor.

Treatment for the acute symptoms of sickle cell anemia is largely supportive and includes plenty of oral fluids, vitamin supplements, and hydroxyurea. Treatment for severe symptoms of sickle cell anemia requires intravenous fluids, narcotic pain medications, and antibiotics.

Treatment for sickle cell anemia includes:


Treatment for a painful crisis in those with sickle cell anemia may include:

Sickle Cell Trait Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of sickle cell anemia.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • Do I need a special exercise program?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • Will my children have sickle cell anemia?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Sickle Cell Trait Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat sickle cell anemia:

Continue to Sickle Cell Trait Home Care

Last Updated: Jun 14, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Sickle Cell Trait References
  1. Ander DS, Vallee PA. Diagnostic evaluation for infectious etiology of sickle cell pain crisis. Am J Emerg Med. 1997 May;15(3):290-2. [9148990]
  2. Fletcher C. Appraisal and coping with vaso-occlusive crisis in adolescents with sickle cell disease. Pediatr Nurs. 2000 May-Jun;26(3):319-24. [12026399]
  3. Johnson L. Managing acute and chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Nurs Times. 2005 Feb 22-28;101(8):40-3. [15754942]
  4. Miller JA, Hinrichs CR. Sickle cell crisis in the adult: chest radiographic findings and comparison with pediatric sickle cell disease. J Natl Med Assoc. 2001 Feb;93(2):58-63. [12653383]
  5. Silbergleit R, Jancis MO, McNamara RM. Management of sickle cell pain crisis in the emergency department at teaching hospitals. J Emerg Med. 1999 Jul-Aug;17(4):625-30. [10431951]
  6. Yale SH, Nagib N, Guthrie T. Approach to the vaso-occlusive crisis in adults with sickle cell disease. Am Fam Physician. 2000 Mar 1;61(5):1349-56, 1363-4. [10735342]
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