Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Sickle Cell Trait Pain in Children

Common medications used at home for pain in children with sickle cell anemia include:

Aspirin and most of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are not used in children except under a doctor's care.

  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Dosing is 10-15 mg per kilogram (5-7 mg per pound) of body weight every 4-6 hours, up to the adult dose.
  • Do not exceed the maximum daily dose.
  • Acetaminophen products come in various strengths. Always follow the package instructions.
  • Avoid this drug in children with liver disease or an allergy to acetaminophen.
  • Common acetaminophen products include Tylenol, Panadol and many others.

Always follow the package instructions.


Continue to Sickle Cell Trait Taking Control

Last Updated: Jan 4, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Sickle Cell Trait References
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  3. Johnson L. Managing acute and chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Nurs Times. 2005 Feb 22-28;101(8):40-3. [15754942]
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  5. Silbergleit R, Jancis MO, McNamara RM. Management of sickle cell pain crisis in the emergency department at teaching hospitals. J Emerg Med. 1999 Jul-Aug;17(4):625-30. [10431951]
  6. Yale SH, Nagib N, Guthrie T. Approach to the vaso-occlusive crisis in adults with sickle cell disease. Am Fam Physician. 2000 Mar 1;61(5):1349-56, 1363-4. [10735342]
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