Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment specialist Home Care pain in adults pain in children warning signs Prevention Outlook Complications Underlying Cause Anatomy

Scratched Cornea Home Care

Initial home care for corneal abrasion and eye foreign body includes:

  • Try to remove the foreign body from your eye:
    • Gently rinse the eye with tap water or eyewash.
    • Place your face in a bowl of water and then open and close eyes under water.
    • If you have dirt under the upper lid, pull the upper lid out and draw it over the lower lid.
  • Use a moist cotton swab to remove dirt from the corner of the eye.
  • Avoid exposure to bright light.

Additional home care for corneal abrasion includes:

Scratched Cornea Pain in Adults

Medications commonly used to control pain and inflammation in adults with a corneal abrasion include:


Acetaminophen
  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Adult dosing is 2 regular strength (325 mg) every 4 hours or 2 extra-strength (500 mg) every 6 hours.
  • Maximum dose is 4,000 mg per day.
  • Avoid this drug if you have alcoholism, liver disease or an allergy to the drug. See the package instructions.
  • Common brand names include Tylenol, Panadol, and many others.

Aspirin

Ibuprofen

Naproxen

Ketoprofen

NSAID Precautions

Scratched Cornea Pain in Children

Common medications used at home for pain in children with a corneal abrasion include:


Aspirin and most of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are not used in children except under a doctor's care.

Acetaminophen
  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Dosing is 10-15 mg per kilogram (5-7 mg per pound) of body weight every 4-6 hours, up to the adult dose.
  • Do not exceed the maximum daily dose.
  • Acetaminophen products come in various strengths. Always follow the package instructions.
  • Avoid this drug in children with liver disease or an allergy to acetaminophen.
  • Common acetaminophen products include Tylenol, Panadol and many others.

Ibuprofen

Naproxen

Scratched Cornea Warning Signs

Notify your doctor if you have a corneal abrasion and any of the following:

Continue to Scratched Cornea Prevention

Last Updated: Feb 15, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Scratched Cornea References
  1. McGwin G Jr, Owsley C. Incidence of emergency department-treated eye injury in the United States. Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 May;123(5):662-6. [15883286]
  2. McGwin G Jr, Xie A, Owsley C. Rate of eye injury in the United States. Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Jul;123(7):970-6. [16009840]
  3. Michael JG, Hug D, Dowd MD. Management of corneal abrasion in children: a randomized clinical trial. Ann Emerg Med. 2002 Jul;40(1):67-72. [12085075]
  4. Weaver CS, Terrell KM. Evidence-based emergency medicine. Update: do ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the pain associated with simple corneal abrasion without delaying healing? Ann Emerg Med. 2003 Jan;41(1):134-40. [12514694]
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