Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview

Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis 177 Causes

The freeMD virtual doctor has found 177 conditions that can cause Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis.

Mouse over to view each condition's most common symptoms

There are 25 common conditions that can cause Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis.
  1. Anxiety Disorder
  2. Arm Cellulitis
  3. Bacterial Pharyngitis
  4. Bacterial Pneumonia
  5. Cellulitis
  6. Cervical Lymphadenitis
  7. Deviated Septum
  8. Endometriosis
  9. Foot Cellulitis
  10. Hand Cellulitis
  11. Hangover
  12. Head Contusion
  13. Influenza
  14. Leg Cellulitis
  15. Migraine Headache
  16. Motion Sickness
  17. Otitis Media
  18. Pharyngitis
  19. Pneumonia
  20. Sinusitis
  21. Skin Infections
  22. Spider Bites
  23. Tonsillitis
  24. Viral Pharyngitis
  25. Viral Syndrome
There are 23 somewhat common conditions that can cause Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis.
  1. Bleeding from Anticoagulant
  2. Drug Side Effect
  3. Drug Toxicity
  4. Epstein Barr Infection
  5. Erythema Infectiosum
  6. Facial Cellulitis
  7. Haemophilus Pneumonia
  8. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease
  9. Head Injury
  10. Heat Illness
  11. Hepatitis A
  12. Hepatitis B
  13. Hyperglycemia
  14. Lymphangitis
  15. Mononucleosis
  16. Primary Dysmenorrhea
  17. Staph Infections
  18. Streptococcal Tonsillitis
  19. Stroke
  20. Swine Flu
  21. TIA
  22. Viral Exanthem
  23. Viral Pneumonia
There are 38 uncommon conditions that can cause Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis.
  1. Acanthamoeba Infection
  2. Acute Glaucoma
  3. Arbovirus Infection
  4. Autonomic Neuropathy
  5. Bacterial Meningitis
  6. Basilar Migraine
  7. Black Widow Spider Bite
  8. Brain Contusion
  9. Brown Recluse Spider Bite
  10. California Group Virus
  11. Chinese Restaurant Syndrome
  12. Concussion
  13. Cytomegalovirus Infection
  14. Diabetic Ketoacidosis
  15. Digoxin Toxicity
  16. Drug Withdrawal
  17. Electrolyte Imbalance
  18. Heat Exhaustion
  19. Heat Syncope
  20. Hepatitis C
  21. High Altitude Illness
  22. Hyponatremia
  23. Klebsiella Pneumonia
  24. Labyrinthitis
  25. Lead Poisoning
  26. Meningitis
  27. Ocular Migraine
  28. Pernicious Anemia
  29. Preeclampsia
  30. Scarlet Fever
  31. Secondary Dysmenorrhea
  32. Smoke Inhalation
  33. Spinal Headache
  34. Staphylococcus Pneumonia
  35. Streptococcus Pneumonia
  36. Theophylline Toxicity
  37. Tick Borne Illness
  38. Viral Meningitis
There are 91 rare conditions that can cause Sudden Onset Headache and Emesis.
  1. Acromegaly
  2. Anthrax
  3. Aspirin Overdose
  4. Astrocytoma
  5. Atypical Mycobacterial Infection
  6. Autonomic Hyperreflexia
  7. Babesiosis
  8. Balantidiasis
  9. Boutonneuse Fever
  10. Brain Abscess
  11. Brain Cancer
  12. Brain Tumor
  13. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
  14. Cat Scratch Disease
  15. Cerebellar Hemorrhage
  16. Cerebral Aneurysm
  17. Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation
  18. Chagas Disease
  19. Chiari Malformation
  20. Chikungunya Disease
  21. Ciguatera
  22. Colorado Tick Fever
  23. Congo Hemorrhagic Fever
  24. Craniopharyngioma
  25. Cryptococcal Infection
  26. Cryptococcal Meningitis
  27. Cyanide Poisoning
  28. Dengue Fever
  29. Diabetes Insipidus
  30. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
  31. Ehrlichiosis
  32. Encephalitis
  33. End Stage Renal Disease
  34. Ependymoma
  35. Epidural Hematoma
  36. Equine Encephalitis
  37. Erysipelas
  38. Glioblastoma Multiforme
  39. Glioma
  40. Hantavirus
  41. HELLP Syndrome
  42. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
  43. Herpes Encephalitis
  44. High Altitude Cerebral Edema
  45. Hookworm Infection
  46. Hydrocephalus
  47. Hyperpituitarism
  48. Intracerebral Hemorrhage
  49. Japanese Encephalitis
  50. Kawasaki Disease
  51. Legionnaire's Disease
  52. Leptospirosis
  53. Listeriosis
  54. Lyme Disease
  55. Malaria
  56. Malignant Hypertension
  57. Mastoiditis
  58. Medullary Cystic Disease
  59. Medulloblastoma
  60. Meningioma
  61. Moraxella Pneumonia
  62. Norwalk Virus Infection
  63. Oligodendroglioma
  64. Periarteritis Nodosa
  65. Periorbital Cellulitis
  66. Phlebotomus Fever
  67. Pineal Tumor
  68. Pituitary Adenoma
  69. Polio
  70. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors
  71. Psittacosis
  72. Relapsing Fever
  73. Retropharyngeal Abscess
  74. Rift Valley Fever
  75. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  76. Skull Fracture
  77. Smallpox
  78. Spina Bifida
  79. St Louis Encephalitis
  80. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
  81. Subdural Hematoma
  82. Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH
  83. Toxic Inhalations
  84. Toxic Shock Syndrome
  85. Tularemia
  86. Vascular Brain Tumors
  87. Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency
  88. Von Hippel-Lindau Disease
  89. West Nile Virus
  90. Yellow Fever
  91. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Last Updated: Nov 8, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
Copyright DSHI Systems, Inc. Powered by: FreeMD - Your Virtual Doctor

References
  1. Ferri's Clinical Advisor, Fred F. Ferri - 2007
  2. Griffith's 5-Minute Clinical Consult, Mark Dambro - 2006
  3. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, Anthony S. Fauci, Eugene Braunwald, Dennis L. Kasper, Stephen L. Hauser, Dan L. Longo, J. Larry Jameson, Joseph Loscalzo - 2008
  4. Emergency medicine: a comprehensive study guide; Judith E. Tintinalli, Gabor D. Kelen, J. Stephan Stapczynski - 2004
  5. Nelson textbook of pediatrics, Robert Kliegman, Richard E. Behrman, Waldo Emerson Nelson - 2007

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