Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Post Operative Wound Complications Treatment

Treatment for post operative wound complications depends on the type of complication. Treatment may include wound care, antibiotics, and surgery.

Specific treatment for a wound infection includes:


Incision and drainage includes:
  • The skin is sterilized using rubbing alcohol or an antibacterial soap.
  • A local anesthetic is injected into the tissues surrounding the abscess.
  • An incision is made with a scalpel.
  • Pus is drained from the abscess.
  • The abscess cavity is flushed clean.
  • In some cases, a rubber drain or a strip of sterile gauze is packed inside the abscess cavity.
  • The gauze or drain placed inside the abscess cavity is usually removed 24-36 hours later.

For more information:

Post Operative Wound Complications Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat post operative wound complications:

Continue to Post Operative Wound Complications Home Care

Last Updated: Dec 23, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Post Operative Wound Complications References
  1. Amland PF, Andenaes K, Samdal F, Lingaas E, Sandsmark M, Abyholm F, Giercksky KE. A prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a single dose of azithromycin on postoperative wound infections in plastic surgery. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1995 Nov;96(6):1378-83. [7480237]
  2. Beiner JM, Grauer J, Kwon BK, Vaccaro AR. Postoperative wound infections of the spine. Neurosurg Focus. 2003 Sep 15;15(3):E14. [15347232]
  3. Picada R, Winter RB, Lonstein JE, Denis F, Pinto MR, Smith MD, Perra JH. Postoperative deep wound infection in adults after posterior lumbosacral spine fusion with instrumentation: incidence and management. J Spinal Disord. 2000 Feb;13(1):42-5. [10710149]
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