Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Lung Disease due to Asbestos Using an Inhaler

If you have been prescribed an inhaler, use the following procedure:

  • Remove the cap from the inhaler.
  • Hold the inhaler with the mouthpiece at the bottom.
  • Shake the inhaler. This mixes the medication properly.
  • Hold the mouthpiece 1-1/2 - 2 inches (2 - 3 finger widths) in front of your mouth. This improves medication delivery by slowing mist delivery and only allowing small particles to be inhaled. Note that your mouth should not be actually touching the mouthpiece.
  • Tilt your head back slightly and open your mouth wide.
  • Gently exhale.
  • Press the inhaler and at the same time begin a slow, deep breath.
  • Continue to breathe in slowly and deeply over 3 - 5 seconds. Breathing slowly delivers the medication deeply into the airways.
  • Hold your breath for up to ten seconds. This allows the medication time to deposit in the airways.
  • Resume normal breathing.
  • Repeat steps 3 - 10 when more than one puff is prescribed.

Additional tips:
  • Keep your inhaler with you at all times, and use it at the first sign of coughing, chest tightness or wheezing.
  • Use an inhaler and spacer as directed.
  • Use the inhaler every 20 minutes for 1 hour during an attack. Continue the medication every 4 hours for 24 to 48 hours.
  • Older children and adults may need a long-acting inhaler medicine (Serevent) if frequent attacks occur.

Continue to Lung Disease due to Asbestos Warning Signs

Last Updated: Oct 19, 2007 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Lung Disease due to Asbestos References
  1. Cugell DW, Kamp DW. Asbestos and the pleura: aChest. 2004 Mar;125(3):1103-17. [15006974]
  2. Hessel PA, Gamble JF, McDonald JC. Asbestos, asbestosis, and lung cancer: a critical assessment of the epidemiological evidence. Thorax. 2005 May;60(5):433-6. [15860721]
  3. Niklinski J, Niklinska W, Chyczewska E, Laudanski J, Naumnik W, Chyczewski L, Pluygers E. The epidemiology of asbestos-related diseases. Lung Cancer. 2004 Aug;45 Suppl 1:S7-S15. [15261426]
  4. Ohar J, Sterling DA, Bleecker E, Donohue J. Changing patterns in asbestos-induced lung disease. Chest. 2004 Feb;125(2):744-53. [14769760]
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