Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Injured Jaw Treatment

Treatment for a jaw injury depends on the type of jaw injury. Treatment of a jaw injury usually includes cold compresses, rest, narcotic pain medications, liquid diet (or soft diet), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain. Surgery may be required for a jaw fracture.

Treatment options for a jaw injury include:

Injured Jaw Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after treatment for a jaw injury.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
    • Is surgery an option for me?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Injured Jaw Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat jaw injuries:

Continue to Injured Jaw Home Care

Last Updated: Dec 16, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Injured Jaw References
  1. Caminiti MF, Weinberg S. Chronic mandibular dislocation: the role of non-surgical and surgical treatment. J Can Dent Assoc. 1998 Jul-Aug;64(7):484-91. [9737079]
  2. Dale RA. Dentoalveolar trauma. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2000 Aug;18(3):521-38. [10967737]
  3. Donat TL, Endress C, Mathog RH. Facial fracture classification according to skeletal support mechanisms. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998 Dec;124(12):1306-14. [9865751]
  4. King RE, Scianna JM, Petruzzelli GJ. Mandible fracture patterns: a suburban trauma center experience. Am J Otolaryngol. 2004 Sep-Oct;25(5):301-7. [15334392]
  5. Lazow SK. The mandible fracture: a treatment protocol. J Craniomaxillofac Trauma. 1996 Summer;2(2):24-30. [11951480]
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