Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment questions for doctor specialist Home Care pain in adults pain in children warning signs Outlook Underlying Cause Types

Hernias Home Care

Home care for hernias includes:

  • Avoid heavy lifting.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise.
  • For mild hernia pain:
    • Lie on your back.
    • Elevate your legs.
    • Apply warm compresses.
    • Apply gentle pressure on the hernia.
    • Push the hernia back into the abdomen.
  • Acetaminophen for pain
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain:
  • Take prescribed medications as directed:
    • Don't skip doses of your medication. This makes them less effective.
    • Be aware of the common side effects that may be caused by your medication.
  • Learn everything you can about hernias:
    • The more you know about your condition, the easier it will be to participate with your doctor in making treatment decisions.
    • Ask your doctor about good sources for information.
    • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Hernias Pain in Adults

Medications commonly used to control pain and inflammation in adults with a hernia include:


Acetaminophen
  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Adult dosing is 2 regular strength (325 mg) every 4 hours or 2 extra-strength (500 mg) every 6 hours.
  • Maximum dose is 4,000 mg per day.
  • Avoid this drug if you have alcoholism, liver disease or an allergy to the drug. See the package instructions.
  • Common brand names include Tylenol, Panadol, and many others.

Aspirin

Ibuprofen

Naproxen

Ketoprofen

NSAID Precautions

Hernias Pain in Children

Common medications used at home for pain in children with a hernia include:


Aspirin and most of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are not used in children except under a doctor's care.

Acetaminophen
  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Dosing is 10-15 mg per kilogram (5-7 mg per pound) of body weight every 4-6 hours, up to the adult dose.
  • Do not exceed the maximum daily dose.
  • Acetaminophen products come in various strengths. Always follow the package instructions.
  • Avoid this drug in children with liver disease or an allergy to acetaminophen.
  • Common acetaminophen products include Tylenol, Panadol and many others.

Ibuprofen

Naproxen

Hernias Warning Signs

Notify your doctor if you have a hernia and any of the following:

  • Hernia is becoming larger
  • Hernia has become painful
  • Hernia has become tender
  • Hernia has become red

See a doctor right away for:

Continue to Hernias Outlook

Last Updated: Mar 3, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Hernias References
  1. Collaboration EH. Laparoscopic compared with open methods of groin hernia repair: systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Br J Surg. 2000 Jul;87(7):860-7. [10931019]
  2. Juretschke LJ. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: update and review. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2001 May-Jun;30(3):259-68. [11383948]
  3. Losanoff JE, Richman BW, Jones JW. Spigelian hernia in a child: case report and review of the literature. Hernia. 2002 Dec;6(4):191-3. [12424600]
  4. McIntosh A, Hutchinson A, Roberts A, Withers H. Evidence-based management of groin hernia in primary care--a systematic review. Fam Pract. 2000 Oct;17(5):442-7. [11021907]
  5. Ollero Fresno JC, Alvarez M, Sanchez M, Rollan V. Femoral hernia in childhood: review of 38 cases. Pediatr Surg Int. 1997 Sep;12(7):520-1. [9238121]
  6. Richards SK, Vipond MN, Earnshaw JJ. Review of the management of recurrent inguinal hernia. Hernia. 2004 May;8(2):144-8. [14685827]
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