Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Heart Block First Degree Overview

Another name for Heart Block First Degree is First Degree Heart Block.

What is a first degree heart block?
A person with first degree heart block has a delay in the electrical impulse that travels through the heart. An electrical impulse stimulates the muscle fibers in the heart to contract. The impulse spreads through the heart in a very organized manner, so that the atria contract first, followed by the ventricles. First degree heart block causes a delay between the contraction of the atria, and the contraction of the ventricles. In first degree heart block the PR interval is longer than 0.20 seconds. This can be measured directly off an ECG.

What are the symptoms of a first degree heart block?
First degree heart block does not cause symptoms.

How does the doctor treat a first degree heart block?
In most cases, no treatment is necessary for first degree heart block. If a medication is causing the first degree heart block, the drug may be discontinued at the treating physician's discretion.

Continue to Heart Block First Degree Symptoms

Last Updated: Sep 24, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Heart Block First Degree References
  1. Bevilacqua LM, Berul CI. Advances in pediatric electrophysiology. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2004 Oct;16(5):494-9. [15367841]
  2. Delisle BP, Anson BD, Rajamani S, January CT. Biology of cardiac arrhythmias: ion channel protein trafficking. Circ Res. 2004 Jun 11;94(11):1418-28. [15192037]
  3. Liautaud S, Khan AJ, Nalamasu SR, Tan IJ, Onwuanyi AE. Variable atrioventricular block in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Apr;24(2):162-5. [15517446]
  4. Nagi KS, Joshi R, Thakur RK. Cardiac manifestations of Lyme disease: a review. Can J Cardiol. 1996 May;12(5):503-6. [8640597]
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