Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Group B Streptococcal Infection Pathophysiology

In 1933, a researcher by the name of Lancefield subdivided the beta-hemolytic streptococci into specific groups. The groups were designated as A, B, C, D and E. Only groups A, B, C, and D are commonly involved in human disease. Group B streptococci (GBS) are also classified into subtypes on the basis of cell wall antigens.

This form of strep bacteria produces toxins that can affect red blood cells and other body tissues. It causes infections ranging from very mild to deadly.

Last Updated: Feb 23, 2007 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Group B Streptococcal Infection References
  1. Benitz WE. Perinatal treatment to prevent early onset group B streptococcal sepsis. Semin Neonatol. 2002 Aug;7(4):301-14. [12401300]
  2. Glass NE, Schulkin J, Chamany S, Riley LE, Schuchat A, Schrag S. Opportunities to reduce overuse of antibiotics for perinatal group B streptococcal disease prevention and management of preterm premature rupture of membranes. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Mar;13(1):5-10. [16040321]
  3. Hager WD, Schuchat A, Gibbs R, Sweet R, Mead P, Larsen JW. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal infection: current controversies. Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Jul;96(1):141-5. [10862856]
  4. Song JY, Lin LL, Shott S, Kimber N, Tangora J, Cohen A, Wells A, Maezes M, Aroutcheva A, Faro S. Evaluation of the Strep B OIA test compared to standard culture methods for detection of group B streptococci. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 1999;7(4):202-5. [10449270]
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