Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Symptoms Evaluation similar conditions Treatment specialist Home Care pain control using a cane using crutches warning signs Prevention Outlook Underlying Cause Anatomy

Groin Pull Home Care

Home care for a groin strain includes:

  • Apply cold compresses:
    • Wrap ice in a moist hand towel. Do not apply ice directly to the skin.
    • Apply for 20-30 minutes, every 1-2 hours, for the first few days.
  • Apply warm compresses after 2 days:
    • Apply for 20-30 minutes, every 6 hours.
  • Rest the injury.
    • Use crutches.
    • Use a cane.
  • Groin stretching exercises:
    • Perform gentle stretching after pain resolves.
  • Gradually return to normal activity over 2-4 weeks.
  • Acetaminophen for pain
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain:
  • Take prescribed medications as directed:
    • Don't skip doses of your medication. This makes them less effective.
    • Be aware of the common side effects that may be caused by your medication.

Groin Pull Pain Control

Medications commonly used to control pain and inflammation in adults with a groin strain include:


Acetaminophen
  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Adult dosing is 2 regular strength (325 mg) every 4 hours or 2 extra-strength (500 mg) every 6 hours.
  • Maximum dose is 4,000 mg per day.
  • Avoid this drug if you have alcoholism, liver disease or an allergy to the drug. See the package instructions.
  • Common brand names include Tylenol, Panadol, and many others.

Aspirin

Ibuprofen

Naproxen

Ketoprofen

NSAID Precautions

Groin Pull Using a Cane

Some patients with a groin strain may benefit from the use of a cane.

Proper Cane Length
The handle of your cane should reach to the crease in your wrist when you stand upright and the end of the cane is resting on the floor.

Using a Cane
Hold the cane in the hand on the opposite side of the leg that needs support. With the cane, you can support some of your weight with your opposite arm. For example, if your left leg needs support, you should use the cane with your right arm. When you step with your left leg, the cane and your left leg should be on the ground at the same time, and you should support some of your weight with the right arm.

Follow these steps:

  • Position your cane one small stride ahead and step forward onto the bad leg. Place weight on your bad leg and the arm that is supported by the cane. Your elbow should be slightly bent as you support your weight.
  • Step forward with the good leg.

Climbing Stairs with a Cane
Climb one stair at a time and rest on one step before moving to the next step.

Follow these steps:
  • Grasp the handrail with the hand that is on the same side as the bad leg.
  • Place your weight on the bad leg and on the arm that is supported by the cane.
  • Step up to the next step with your good leg.
  • Transfer your weight to the good leg.
  • Move the cane and the bad leg to the step where you placed the good leg.
  • Support and stabilize yourself with your legs, the cane, and the handrail before moving to the next step.

Going down Stairs with a Cane
Go down one stair at a time and rest on one step before moving to the next step.

Follow these steps:
  • Grasp the handrail with the hand that is on the same side as the bad leg.
  • Place your weight on the good leg.
  • Place your bad leg and the cane on the step below.
  • Transfer your weight to the bad leg and the arm supported by the cane.
  • Move the stable leg to the step where you placed the cane and the bad leg.
  • Support and stabilize yourself with your legs, the cane, and the handrail before moving to the next step.

Groin Pull Using Crutches

Some patients with a groin strain will require crutches. You must be able to support your entire weight on one leg in order to use crutches. Crutches allow you to walk without placing any weight on an injured or painful leg.

Proper Adjustment for Crutches

  • The top of your crutch should be 1-1.5 inches below your armpit as you stand upright and the crutch rests on the floor.
  • The hand grips should be even with your hip joint.
  • Your elbows should bend as you use the hand grips.

Non Weight Bearing Technique
  • Stand on the good leg while using the crutches for balance.
  • Hold the bad leg off the floor.
  • Begin your step as if you are going to step on the bad leg, but do not place any weight on this leg. Instead, place both crutches in front of you and place your weight on your arms.
  • Your arms are supported by the crutches as you grip the crutch handles.
  • The crutches should be placed on the floor at an angle away from the side of your body, in a shape like the upright arms of the capital letter, "A."
  • Your elbows should bend as you support your weight.
  • Gently push off with your good leg after the crutches are firmly planted on the floor. Swing your body forward between the crutches.
  • Rest the top of the crutches tightly against each side of your chest and continue to support your weight with your arms.
  • Do not rest your armpits on the tops of the crutches. This can cause nerve damage.
  • Place your good leg on the floor and allow it to completely support your weight. Swing your crutches slightly away from your body and forward. Place the crutches on the floor to prepare for the next step.
  • Focus on where you are walking -- do not look at your feet.

Partial Weight Bearing Technique
  • Stand on the good leg while using the crutches for balance.
  • Begin to step on the bad leg, but do not place your entire weight on this leg. Instead, place most of your weight on your arms.
  • Your arms are supported by the crutches as you grip the crutch handles.
  • The crutches should be placed on the floor at an angle away from the side of your body, in a shape like the upright arms of the capital letter, "A."
  • Your elbows should bend as you support your weight.
  • Gently push off with your good leg after the crutches are firmly planted on the floor. Swing your bad leg forward between the crutches.
  • Rest the top of the crutches tightly against each side of your chest. Continue to support your weight with your arms and the bad leg.
  • Do not rest your armpits on the tops of the crutches.
  • Place your good leg on the floor and allow it to completely support your weight. Swing your crutches slightly away from your body and forward. Place the crutches on the floor to prepare for the next step.
  • Focus on where you are walking -- do not look at your feet.

Climbing Stairs with Crutches
When climbing stairs, you should climb one stair at a time, completely resting for a moment on one step before moving to the next step.

Follow these steps:
  • Start by supporting your weight with your good leg and both crutches.
  • Place your weight on both of the crutches and move your good leg up to the next step.
  • Transfer your weight to the good leg.
  • Lift the bad leg and the crutches onto the same step where you placed the good leg.
  • Support and stabilize yourself with both crutches and the good leg before moving to the next step.

Going down Stairs on Crutches
When going down stairs, you should go down one stair at a time. Stop and rest for a moment on one step before moving to the next step.

Follow these steps:
  • Start by supporting your weight with your good leg and both crutches.
  • Place your weight on the good leg and place both of the crutches onto the next lower step.
  • Transfer your weight to both crutches.
  • Place the good leg onto the same step where you placed the crutches.
  • Support and stabilize yourself with both crutches and the good leg before moving to the next step.

Groin Pull Warning Signs

Notify your doctor if you have a groin strain and any of the following:

Continue to Groin Pull Prevention

Last Updated: Feb 25, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Groin Pull References
  1. Emery CA, Meeuwisse WH, Powell JW. Groin and abdominal strain injuries in the National Hockey League. Clin J Sport Med. 1999 Jul;9(3):151-6. [10512343]
  2. Morelli V, Weaver V. Groin injuries and groin pain in athletes: part 1. Prim Care. 2005 Mar;32(1):163-83. [15831317]
  3. Verrall GM, Hamilton IA, Slavotinek JP, Oakeshott RD, Spriggins AJ, Barnes PG, Fon GT. Hip joint range of motion reduction in sports-related chronic groin injury diagnosed as pubic bone stress injury. J Sci Med Sport. 2005 Mar;8(1):77-84. [15887904]
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