Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Glioblastoma Multiforme Surgery

Whenever possible, treatment of glioblastoma multiforme should include surgery to remove the entire cancer. Following surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may be used to decrease the risk of recurrence. Some tumors are deeply embedded in the brain and surrounded by vital structures or blood vessels. This makes many tumors impossible to remove without damaging other parts of the brain.

Some glioblastoma multiforme may require the placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt to correct hydrocephalus (increased fluid pressure inside the brain). A VP shunt is a tube that drains extra fluid from around the brain, into the abdominal cavity. The tube runs from the head to the abdomen, under the skin.

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Last Updated: Mar 18, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Glioblastoma Multiforme References
  1. Demir MK, Hakan T, Akinci O, Berkman Z. Primary cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme. Diagn Interv Radiol. 2005 Jun;11(2):83-6. [15957093]
  2. Grossman SA, Batara JF. Current management of glioblastoma multiforme. Semin Oncol. 2004 Oct;31(5):635-44. [15497116]
  3. Parsa AT, Wachhorst S, Lamborn KR, Prados MD, McDermott MW, Berger MS, Chang SM. Prognostic significance of intracranial dissemination of glioblastoma multiforme in adults. J Neurosurg. 2005 Apr;102(4):622-8. [15871503]
  4. Stark AM, Nabavi A, Mehdorn HM, Blomer U. Glioblastoma multiforme-report of 267 cases treated at a single institution. Surg Neurol. 2005 Feb;63(2):162-9. [1568066]
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