Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment questions for doctor specialist Home Care diet self monitoring taking control warning signs Prevention Outlook Complications Underlying Cause

Gestational Diabetes Diet

It is important to follow a healthy diet if you have gestational diabetes.

Obtain nutritional counseling from a registered dietician. This person can help you develop specific meal plan that is based on your height, weight, and activity level.

Total Calories
Your daily intake of calories should allow you to maintain a healthy weight. Total calorie requirements vary according to your weight, height and activity. Your doctor and dietitian will recommend a total daily calorie requirement that is right for you.

Carbohydrates
Carbohydrates should account for 55-60% of your total calories. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Whole grains, fruits, vegetables and fiber, are better sources of carbohydrate than sugars. Dietary fiber has been shown to prevent constipation, reduce the risk of colon cancer and reduce cholesterol levels. A healthy diet contains 20-35 grams of fiber per day.

Protein
Protein should account for 10-20% of your total calories. Those who have normal kidneys should consume about 50 to 60 grams of protein per day. Those who have kidney disease should consume no more than 45 grams of protein per day.

Total Fat
Fat should account for less than 30% of your total calories. Consume only unsaturated fats that are low in cholesterol. About 10% to 15% of your total calories should be in the form of monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil. Cholesterol intake should be limited to less than 300 milligrams per day.

Sweeteners
Consider replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners. Saccharin (Sweet-n-Low), aspartame (Equal), and sucralose (Splenda) are acceptable alternatives.

Sodium
Sodium intake should not exceed 3,000 mg per day. Those who have high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney disease or liver disease should consume no more than 2,000 mg of sodium per day.

Vitamins and Minerals
Regular prenatal vitamins

Continue to Gestational Diabetes Self Monitoring

Last Updated: Dec 14, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
Copyright DSHI Systems, Inc. Powered by: FreeMD - Your Virtual Doctor

PubMed Gestational Diabetes References
  1. Allen SR. Gestational diabetes: a review of the treatment options. Treat Endocrinol. 2003;2(5):357-65. [15981952]
  2. Forsbach-Sanchez G, Tamez-Perez HE, Vazquez-Lara J. Diabetes and pregnancy. Arch Med Res. 2005 May-Jun;36(3):291-9. [15925019]
  3. Jacobson GF, Ramos GA, Ching JY, Kirby RS, Ferrara A, Field DR. Comparison of glyburide and insulin for the management of gestational diabetes in a large managed care organization. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jul;193(1):118-24. [16021069]
  4. Kelly L, Evans L, Messenger D. Controversies around gestational diabetes. Practical information for family doctors. Can Fam Physician. 2005 May;51:688-95. [15934273]
FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for evaluation and treatment by a physician. Please review our terms of use.