Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Gastroenteritis Campylobacter Anatomy

To better understand campylobacter enteritis, it helps to understand the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract.

The esophagus is a muscular tube that pushes food to the stomach. The stomach is a large pouch that receives food from a meal. The stomach slowly pushes the food into the small intestine, which absorbs nutrients from the food.

Food passes through the small intestine and into the large intestine, which absorbs water from the food. The small intestine is about 18 feet (3.5 m) long and the large intestine is about 5 feet (1.5 m) long.

Gastrointestinal anatomy:

  • Esophagus and stomach
  • Intestines
  • Blood vessels of the intestines
  • Entire gastrointestinal tract

Last Updated: Nov 3, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Gastroenteritis Campylobacter References
  1. Allos BM: Campylobacter jejuni Infections: update on emerging issues and trends. Clin Infect Dis 2001 Apr 15; 32(8): 1201-6. [11283810]
  2. Crushell E, Harty S, Sharif F, Bourke B: Enteric campylobacter: purging its secrets? Pediatr Res 2004 Jan; 55(1): 3-12. [14605259]
  3. Mao Y, Zhu C, Boedeker EC. Foodborne enteric infections. Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2003 Jan;19(1):11-22. [15699888]
  4. Mishu B, Ilyas AA, Koski CL, et al: Serologic evidence of previous Campylobacter jejuni infection in patients with the Guillain-Barre syndrome. Ann Intern Med 1993 Jun 15; 118(12): 947-53. [8489109]
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