Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Symptoms Evaluation Treatment drugs chemotherapy radiation therapy specialist surgery Home Care anorexia diet pain in adults pain in children side effects warning signs Outlook Complications Underlying Cause

Ganglioneuroma Home Care

Home care for ganglioneuroma includes:

  • Follow a cancer diet:
    • Good nutrition can boost the immune system and help make your treatments more effective.
  • Follow an exercise plan developed with your doctor.
  • Acetaminophen for pain
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain:
  • Take prescribed medications as directed:
    • Don't skip doses of your medication. This makes them less effective.
    • Be aware of the common side effects that may be caused by your medication.
  • Learn everything you can about ganglioneuroma:
    • The more you know about your condition, the easier it will be to participate with your doctor in making treatment decisions.
    • Ask your doctor about good sources for information.
    • Write down questions to ask your doctor
  • Create a support group:
    • Include family and friends
    • Learn about support groups in your community or contact your local chapter of the American Cancer Society.

Ganglioneuroma Anorexia

Many patients with ganglioneuroma will suffer from anorexia.

Anorexia means loss of appetite. Anorexia is a problem with many forms of cancer, because cancer can affect the body's hormones, digestive system and brain. It is also a common side effect of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Good nutrition is an important part of successful cancer treatment. Adequate nutrition can boost the immune system and help increase the effectiveness of cancer therapy.

Home care for anorexia includes:

  • Avoid stomach irritants such as aspirin or ibuprofen.
  • Avoid excessive caffeine and other stimulants.
  • Check with your doctor about drinking alcohol.
  • Do not force yourself to eat at standard times. Eat when you are hungry instead.
  • Concentrate on eating a healthy diet. Avoid junk foods.
  • Select healthy, high-calorie foods that you enjoy.
  • Eat more frequent, smaller meals.
  • Get some exercise every day.
  • Keep a daily log of your weight.
  • Don't smoke. Nicotine can suppress the appetite.
  • Ask your doctor or nutritionist about dietary supplements.
  • Ask your doctor if any medications you may be taking can cause anorexia.
  • Take any prescribed medications as directed.
  • Anti-nausea medications:
  • Appetite stimulants:

Ganglioneuroma Diet

A person with ganglioneuroma may benefit from the following diet.

There are two main goals for a chemotherapy diet:

  • Achieve and maintain a reasonable weight.
  • Prevent and correct poor nutrition.

Strategies for evaluating weight loss and anorexia include:
  • Determine symptoms that might cause loss of appetite.
  • Learn what foods stimulate the appetite.
  • Provide nutritional and dietary counseling.

Practical dietary guidelines:
  • Atmosphere does make a difference: an attractively set table can help take your mind off a poor appetite.
  • Aromas may also help stimulate the appetite, such as freshly baked bread and cookies.
  • A glass of wine or beer prior to meals may stimulate the appetite.
  • Avoid foods that do not interest you.
  • Discuss your eating problems with your doctor.
  • Give food a chance: food that sounds unappealing today, may sound good tomorrow.
  • Stay away from raw eggs and raw meats.
  • Take advantage of a good appetite.
  • Eat when you feel hungry: do not wait for mealtime.

Benefits of proper nutrition during chemotherapy:
  • Improves your tolerance to therapy: a well-nourished body is stronger and more resilient than a poorly nourished one
  • Increases the effectiveness of therapy
  • Regulates your weight
  • Speeds recovery from treatment

Ganglioneuroma Pain in Adults

Medications commonly used to control pain and inflammation in adults with a ganglioneuroma include:

  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Adult dosing is 2 regular strength (325 mg) every 4 hours or 2 extra-strength (500 mg) every 6 hours.
  • Maximum dose is 4,000 mg per day.
  • Avoid this drug if you have alcoholism, liver disease or an allergy to the drug. See the package instructions.
  • Common brand names include Tylenol, Panadol, and many others.





NSAID Precautions

Ganglioneuroma Pain in Children

Common medications used at home for pain in children with a ganglioneuroma include:

  • Acetaminophen decreases fever and pain, but does not help inflammation.
  • Dosing is 10-15 mg per kilogram (5-7 mg per pound) of body weight every 4-6 hours, up to the adult dose.
  • Do not exceed the maximum daily dose.
  • Acetaminophen products come in various strengths. Always follow the package instructions.
  • Avoid this drug in children with liver disease or an allergy to acetaminophen.
  • Common acetaminophen products include Tylenol, Panadol and many others.



Ganglioneuroma Side Effects

Tips to control nausea and vomiting in someone with a ganglioneuroma include:

Irritation of the lining of the mouth and intestinal tract is called mucositis. Home care measures for mucositis include:

Ganglioneuroma Warning Signs

Continue to Ganglioneuroma Outlook

Last Updated: Feb 23, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Ganglioneuroma References
  1. Domanski HA. Fine-needle aspiration of ganglioneuroma. Diagn Cytopathol. 2005 Jun;32(6):363-6. [15880712]
  2. McLendon RE, Provenzale J. Glioneuronal tumors of the central nervous system. Brain Tumor Pathol. 2002;19(2):51-8. [12622133]
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