Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Fractured Heel Bone Treatment

The treatment for a calcaneus fracture depends on type and the severity of the fracture. Some calcaneus fractures can be treated with a splint, but most calcaneus fractures are treated with a leg cast. Crutches help to reduce stress on the fractured bones. Severe calcaneus fractures require surgery to repair broken bones. Most calcaneus fractures heal in 6 to 8 weeks, but severe fractures may take 12 weeks or longer to heal. The calcaneus bone is slow to heal and prone to calcaneal fracture malunion (incomplete healing at the fracture line).

Treatment for calcaneus fracture may include:

Fractured Heel Bone Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of a calcaneus fracture.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
    • Is surgery an option for me?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • Do I need a special exercise program?
  • Will I need physical therapy?
  • Will I need occupational therapy?
  • What else can I do to reduce my risk for having this injury again?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Fractured Heel Bone Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat calcaneus fracture:

Continue to Fractured Heel Bone Home Care

Last Updated: Jun 3, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Fractured Heel Bone References
  1. Burns J, Keenan AM, Redmond A. Foot type and overuse injury in triathletes. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2005 May-Jun;95(3):235-41. [15901809]
  2. Kunkel M, Miller SD. Return to work after foot and ankle injury. Foot Ankle Clin. 2002 Jun;7(2):421-8, viii. [12462119]
  3. Luetters CM, Keegan TH, Sidney S, Quesenberry CP, Prill M, Sternfeld B, Kelsey J. Risk factors for foot fracture among individuals aged 45 years and older. Osteoporos Int. 2004 Dec;15(12):957-63. [15118813]
  4. Seybold D, Schildhauer TA, Muhr G. Combined ipsilateral fractures of talus and calcaneus. Foot Ankle Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):318-24. [18348829]
  5. Tran T, Thordarson D. Functional outcome of multiply injured patients with associated foot injury. Foot Ankle Int. 2002 Apr;23(4):340-3. [11991481]
  6. Ulusal AE, Lin CH, Lin YT, Ulusal BG, Yazar S. The use of free flaps in the management of type IIIB open calcaneal fractures. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008 Jun;121(6):2010-9. [18520889]
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