Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Foot Infection due to Diabetes Using a Walker

Some people with diabetic foot problems may require more support than a cane or crutches can offer. Walkers with four solid feet on the bottom give you the most stability. A walker is much more stable than crutches or a cane. A walker allows you to keep weight off one leg while you walk. It is also lends support if both of your legs are unstable or painful.

The handles of your walker should reach the crease in your wrist when you stand upright and the walker is placed on the floor. Moving slowly is important when you use a walker.

Using a Walker

  • Place your walker one stride ahead of you. Make sure that the legs of your walker are level on the ground.
  • With both hands, grasp the handles on the walker. Lean forward and support your weight on your arms.
  • Step forward with your good leg. Place your foot in the center of the square that is made by the walker feet.
  • Step forward with the bad leg.

Walker Rules
  • Take small steps when you turn.
  • In order to sit in a chair, back up until your legs touch the chair. Reach behind you in order to feel the seat and then sit down.
  • In order to get up from a chair, push yourself up with your arms and then grasp the handles on the walker.
  • Make sure that the rubber tips on the legs of the walker are tightly fastened. Replace the rubber tips if they become worn.
  • Do not use your walker to climb stairs.
  • Do not use your walker on an escalator.

General Safety Tips
  • Remove small area rugs, electrical cords, spilled liquids or other items that may cause you to slip.
  • In the bathroom, install non-slip bath mats, toilet grab bars, a raised toilet seat, shower grab bars, and a shower tub seat.
  • Keep needed household items in close reach. Store less used items out of the way.
  • Use a backpack, fanny pack, apron or briefcase in order to carry items.

Continue to Foot Infection due to Diabetes Warning Signs

Last Updated: Dec 9, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Foot Infection due to Diabetes References
  1. Edmonds M, Foster A. The use of antibiotics in the diabetic foot. Am J Surg. 2004 May;187(5A):25S-28S. [15147988]
  2. Olson DE, Norris SL. Diabetes in older adults. Overview of AGS guidelines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in geriatric populations. Geriatrics. 2004 Apr;59(4):18-24. [15086070]
  3. Ulbrecht JS, Cavanagh PR, Caputo GM. Foot problems in diabetes: an overview. Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug 1;39 Suppl 2:S73-82. [15306983]
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