Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Factor 9 Deficiency Treatment

Treatment for hemophilia B includes intravenous infusions of factor 9 and fresh frozen plasma. Other treatments include the administration of epsilon aminocaproic acid, and coagulation factor VIIa.

Treatment of hemophilia B includes:

Factor 9 Deficiency Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of hemophilia B.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • Do I need a special exercise program?
  • Will I need physical therapy?
  • Will I need occupational therapy?
  • What else can I do to reduce my risk for complications?
  • What else can I do to reduce my risk for having this problem again?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Factor 9 Deficiency Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat hemophilia B:

Continue to Factor 9 Deficiency Home Care

Last Updated: Dec 15, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Factor 9 Deficiency References
  1. Dunn AL, Abshire TC. Recent advances in the management of the child who has hemophilia. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2004 Dec;18(6):1249-76, viii. [15511615]
  2. Ettingshausen CE, Kreuz W. Long-term aspects of hemophilia B treatment: part I-role for prophylaxis. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2004 Jun;15 Suppl 2:S11-3. [15322452]
  3. Gringeri A. Long-term aspects of hemophilia B treatment: part II. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2004 Jun;15 Suppl 2:S15-6. [15322453]
  4. Leissinger CA. Prevention of bleeds in hemophilia patients with inhibitors: emerging data and clinical direction. Am J Hematol. 2004 Oct;77(2):187-93. [15389908]
  5. Plug I, van der Bom JG, Peters M, et al. Thirty years of hemophilia treatment in the Netherlands, 1972-2001. Blood. 2004 Dec 1;104(12):3494-500. [15308570]
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