Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Risk Factors Symptoms Evaluation Treatment drugs questions for doctor specialist surgery balloon dilation TUIP TULIP TUMT TUNA TURP Home Care catheter care taking control warning signs Prevention Complications Anatomy

Enlarged Prostate Treatment

The treatment for an enlarged prostate often includes medications and surgery to improve urination.

The treatment for enlarged prostate includes:

  • Medications for enlarged prostate
    • Shrinks prostate and reduces symptoms by improving urine flow
  • Surgery for enlarged prostate
    • To relieve urinary obstruction.

Medications used for the treatment of enlarged prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia include:

Surgical procedures used to treat enlarged prostate include:
  • Transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP)
  • Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT)
  • Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA)
  • Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP)
  • Transurethral ultrasound-guided induced prostatectomy (TULIP)
  • Balloon dilation of the prostate

Enlarged Prostate Drugs

Muscles control the opening and closing of the urethra. Urine cannot flow from the bladder when the muscle is tight. When the muscle relaxes, urine flows through the urethra. Medications for BPH relax the muscles in the urethra.

Medications used for the treatment of enlarged prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia include:


Combination medications used for the treatment of enlarged prostate include:

Enlarged Prostate Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of an enlarged prostate.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
    • Is surgery an option for me?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • What else can I do to reduce my risk for complications?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Enlarged Prostate Specialist

Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat benign prostatic hyperplasia:

Enlarged Prostate Surgery

Surgery is usually offered to those who have moderate to severe symptoms of an enlarged prostate gland.

Surgical procedures used to treat enlarged prostate include:

  • Transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP)
  • Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT)
  • Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA)
  • Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP)
  • Transurethral ultrasound-guided induced prostatectomy (TULIP)
  • Balloon dilation of the prostate

Enlarged Prostate Balloon Dilation

Balloon dilation has been used as an alternative to prostate surgery in some men with enlarged prostate.

In order to perform the procedure, a balloon-tipped catheter is inserted into the urethra. The balloon is inflated in the portion of the urethra that is narrowed by the surrounding prostate. This stretches the passageway, allowing urine to flow.

Enlarged Prostate TUIP

Transurethral incision of the prostate or TUIP is an alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).

During TUIP, the surgeon makes incisions in the prostate near the bladder, using special cutting instruments that are inserted into the urethra. The incisions open the urethra, so that urine can flow more easily from the bladder.

The results with TUIP are as good as TURP, but TUIP does not remove tissue from the prostate, while TURP does remove tissue from the prostate. Similar to TURP, TUIP provides relief in up to 80% of those who undergo the procedure. The risk for complications from TUIP are lower than those for TURP.

Enlarged Prostate TULIP

Transurethral laser incision of the prostate or TULIP is similar to transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP), except the surgeon inserts a laser into the urethra, in order to make incisions in the prostate. The incisions open the urethra, so that urine can flow more easily from the bladder.

The advantages of this procedure over transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) include:

  • Decreased bleeding
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Lower risk of impotence

Enlarged Prostate TUMT

Transurethral microwave thermotherapy or TUMT uses microwaves to deliver heat to the prostate tissue. The surgeon delivers the microwave energy to the prostate using a special catheter. The catheter keeps the urethra cool, while the microwave energy heats the surrounding prostate. The heat destroys the surrounding prostate tissue.

TUMT is generally not as effective as TURP, TUIP or TULIP.

Enlarged Prostate Tuna

Transurethral needle ablation or TUNA uses high frequency radio waves to destroy prostate tissue. The surgeon delivers the microwave energy to the prostate using two needles that function through a special catheter. The catheter keeps the urethra cool, while the radio wave energy heats the surrounding prostate. The heat destroys the surrounding prostate tissue, which opens the urethra to improve urine flow.

TUNA is generally not as effective as TURP, TUIP or TULIP.

Enlarged Prostate TURP

Transurethral resection of the prostate or TURP uses an electrified loop of wire to shave away portions of the prostate gland. The surgeon uses a special catheter to introduce the loop into the urethra. This opens the urethra and improves urine flow.

TURP has been used extensively to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy. Other less invasive techniques have been developed to avoid the risk for complications seen with TURP.

Complications include:

Continue to Enlarged Prostate Home Care

Last Updated: Dec 10, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Enlarged Prostate References
  1. Barry MJ, O'Leary MP: Advances in benign prostatic hyperplasia. The developmental and clinical utility of symptom scores. Urol Clin North Am 1995 May; 22(2): 299-307. [7539176]
  2. Comhaire F, Mahmoud A. Girman CJ, Jacobsen SJ, Guess HA, et al: Natural history of prostatism: relationship among symptoms, prostate volume and peak urinary flow rate. J Urol 1995 May; 153(5): 1510-5. [7536258]
  3. Milani S, Djavan B. Lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia: latest update on alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists. BJU Int. 2005 Jun;95 Suppl 4:29-36. [15871733]
  4. Preventing diseases of the prostate in the elderly using hormones and nutriceuticals. Aging Male. 2004 Jun;7(2):155-69. [15672940]
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