Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Cystitis Interstitial Anatomy

To better understand interstitial cystitis, it helps to understand the anatomy of the bladder.

Urine flows from the kidneys, through the ureters, and into the bladder. The bladder holds 10 to 20 ounces (300 to 600 ml) of urine. As the bladder fills, the bladder wall stretches. This sensation results in the urge to urinate. The act of urination causes the bladder to empty into the urethra. Urine flows through the urethra and exits the body.

Anatomy of the bladder:

  • Female bladder
  • Male bladder and prostate

Last Updated: Nov 4, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Cystitis Interstitial References
  1. Clemens JQ, Meenan RT, O'Keeffe Rosetti MC, Brown SO, Gao SY, Calhoun EA. Prevalence of interstitial cystitis symptoms in a managed care population. J Urol. 2005 Aug;174(2):576-80. [16006901]
  2. Kahn BS, Stanford EJ, Mishell DR Jr, Rosenberg MT, Wysocki S. Management of patients with interstitial cystitis or chronic pelvic pain of bladder origin: a consensus report. Curr Med Res Opin. 2005 Apr;21(4):509-16. [15899099]
  3. Porru D, Politano R, Gerardini M, Giliberto GL, Stancati S, Pasini L, Tinelli C, Rovereto B. Different clinical presentation of interstitial cystitis syndrome. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2004 May-Jun;15(3):198-202. [15168001]
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