Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Symptoms Anatomy Genetics

Congenital Brittle Bones Anatomy

To better understand osteogenesis imperfecta, it helps to understand bone anatomy.

The skeleton is a living structure that supports the entire body. Bone is made up of an outer shell of very dense bone that surrounds a honeycomb-like structure of softer bone. Bone mainly consists of protein and calcium. Without calcium, bone will become weak.

The human skeleton can be divided into two sections:

  • Axial skeleton:
    • A total of 80 bones including the skull, spine, and chest
  • Appendicular skeleton:
    • A total of 126 bones including the pelvic girdle, limbs, feet and hands

Anatomy examples:
  • Internal structure of bone
  • The pelvic girdle
  • The chest
  • The skull
  • The spine
  • Skeletal system
  • Lower extremity
  • Hands and wrists
  • Feet

Continue to Congenital Brittle Bones Genetics

Last Updated: Feb 17, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
Copyright DSHI Systems, Inc. Powered by: FreeMD - Your Virtual Doctor

PubMed Congenital Brittle Bones References
  1. Chevrel G, Cimaz R. Osteogenesis imperfecta: new treatment options. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2006 Dec;8(6):474-9. [17092446]
  2. Martin E, Shapiro JR. Osteogenesis imperfecta:epidemiology and pathophysiology. Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2007 Sep;5(3):91-7. [17925189]
  3. Rauch F, Glorieux FH. Treatment of children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2006 Dec;4(4):159-64. [17112427]
FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for evaluation and treatment by a physician. Please review our terms of use.