Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Conditions Evaluation guideline 2 to 6 years guideline 7 to 12 years guideline infants guideline teens Prevention diet exercise vaccines chicken pox DTaP hepatitis a hepatitis b HIB influenza IPV MMR prevnar

Children's Health Hepatitis B

The hepatitis B vaccine protects against infection with the hepatitis B virus. Everyone who is under 18 years of age should get hepatitis B vaccine. Unimmunized children younger than 18 years may begin the series at any age. Adults should get the hepatitis B vaccine if they are at risk for infection.

Indications for use

  • Dialysis nurses
  • Dialysis patients
  • Health care workers
  • Infants with hepatitis B infected mothers
  • Institutionalized patients
  • Intravenous drug users
  • Male homosexuals.
  • Sexually promiscuous persons
  • Geographical area; your risk is also higher if your parents were born in:
    • Southeast Asia
    • Africa
    • Amazon Basin in South America
    • Pacific Islands
    • Middle East

Those who have had a serious reaction to baker's yeast in the past should not receive this vaccine.

Administration
Complete immunity to hepatitis B virus will require the administration of three boosters:
  • In most cases the first booster may be administered anywhere from birth to through the second month of life. Infants born to hepatitis B infected mothers should receive vaccine and 0.5 mL of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) within 12 hours of birth at separate sites.
  • The second booster should be administered at least one month after the first dose. Infants born to hepatitis B infected mothers should receive the second dose at least one month after the first dose.
  • The third booster should be given at least 2 months after the second, but not before six months of age. Infants born to hepatitis B infected mothers should receive their third dose at least four months after the first and two months after the second, but not before 6 months of age.
  • Illness may require a shot to be delayed. Only your doctor can make this determination.

Side Effects
Mild problems:
  • Soreness at the vaccination site (1 out of 11 children)
  • Mild to moderate fever ( 1 out of 14 children)

Severe problems:
Severe allergic reactions to HIB are very rare. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include:

Continue to Children's Health HIB

FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for evaluation and treatment by a physician. Please review our terms of use.