Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Symptoms Evaluation Treatment questions for doctor Home Care pain and inflammation using a cane using a walker using crutches warning signs Complications Underlying Cause

Charcot Joint Treatment

The initial treatment for Charcot joint may includes a cast, and crutches or a walker. This reduces stress on the joints and allows bones to heal. The cast may be designed to allow a person with Charcot joint to support some of the body weight. The cast may be required for 3 to 6 weeks. Additional treatment involves a protective splint and custom footwear, in order to protect the foot from further injury. The treatment process may take 1 to 2 years. The foot must be examined frequently for evidence of injury. Surgery may be required to repair or replace a severely damaged joint.

Treatment for Charcot joint may include:

  • Casts for Charcot joint
  • Rest the joint:
    • Use a walker.
    • Use crutches.
    • Use a cane.
  • Protective splints
  • Custom footwear
  • Surgery:
    • Joint replacement surgery to replace severely damaged joints

Charcot Joint Questions For Doctor

The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of a Charcot joint.

Questions to ask before treatment:

  • What are my treatment options?
    • Is surgery an option for me?
  • What are the risks associated with treatment?
  • Do I need to stay in the hospital?
    • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • What are the complications I should watch for?
  • How long will I be on medication?
  • What are the potential side effects of my medication?
  • Does my medication interact with nonprescription medicines or supplements?
  • Should I take my medication with food?

Questions to ask after treatment:
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there any medications or supplements I should avoid?
  • When can I resume my normal activities?
  • When can I return to work?
  • Do I need a special exercise program?
  • Will I need physical therapy?
  • Will I need occupational therapy?
  • What else can I do to reduce my risk for having this problem again?
  • How often will I need to see my doctor for checkups?
  • What local support and other resources are available?

Continue to Charcot Joint Home Care

Last Updated: Jun 6, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Charcot Joint References
  1. Aliabadi P, Nikpoor N, Alparslan L. Imaging of neuropathic arthropathy. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol. 2003 Sep;7(3):217-25. [14593563]
  2. Armstrong DG, Peters EJ. Charcot's arthropathy of the foot. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2002 Jul-Aug;92(7):390-4. [12122125]
  3. Trepman E, Nihal A, Pinzur MS. Current topics review: Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle. Foot Ankle Int. 2005 Jan;26(1):46-63. [15680119]
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