Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Cardiac Chest Pain Prevention

Prevention is the key to managing the risk for angina. Other conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol contribute to the development of coronary artery disease. These illnesses must be well-managed, in order to minimize the progression of coronary artery disease.

Lifestyle choices that help to prevent angina include:

Cardiac Chest Pain Diet

Dietary guidelines for the prevention of angina include:

  • Limit your intake of fat to 30% of your total calories.
  • 10% to 15% of your total calories should be in the form of monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil.
  • Consume only unsaturated fats that are low in cholesterol.
  • Consume less than 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day.
  • Consume less than 3,000 mg of salt per day. Consume less than 2,000 mg of salt per day if you have high blood pressure, kidney disease, liver disease or congestive heart failure.
  • Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Avoid red meat.
  • Avoid fad diets.
  • Talk to your doctor about B vitamin supplements.
  • Talk to your doctor about vitamin D supplements.
  • Eat foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids:
    • Omega-3's are present in salmon, tuna, and mackerel.
    • Walnuts and flax seed are also rich in omega 3's.
    • If you don't like fish, your local pharmacy has omega-3 supplements in capsule form.
    • Omega-3-acid ethyl esters (Lovaza)
  • Consume more fiber. Sources include:
    • Fruits
    • Vegetables
    • Bran
    • Barley
    • Oats
    • Legumes
    • Whole grains
    • Brown rice

Continue to Cardiac Chest Pain Outlook

Last Updated: May 16, 2011 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Cardiac Chest Pain References
  1. Abrams J. Clinical practice. Chronic stable angina. N Engl J Med. 2005 Jun 16;352(24):2524-33. [1595880]
  2. Brown TL, Merrill J, Hill P, Bengel FM. Relationship of coronary calcium and myocardial perfusion in individuals with chest pain. Assessed by integrated rubidium-82 PET-CT. Nuklearmedizin. 2008;47(6):255-260. [19057799]
  3. O'Toole L. Angina (stable). Clin Evid. 2005 Jun;(13):62-9. [16135259]
  4. Parker JO. Angina pectoris: a review of current and emerging therapies. Am J Manag Care. 2004 Oct;10(11 Suppl):S332-8. [15603242]
  5. Scheidt S. Treatment of stable angina: medical and invasive therapy--implications for the elderly. Am J Geriatr Cardiol. 2005 Jul-Aug;14(4):183-92. [16015059]
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