Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Cancer of the Prostate Biopsy

The diagnosis of prostate cancer is usually confirmed by performing a needle biopsy of the prostate gland. During a prostate biopsy, a needle is inserted through the rectum and advanced into the prostate gland. Ultrasound is used to guide the needle during the biopsy. A small tissue sample is collected, and then studied under a microscope to look for cancer cells. Usually, the biopsy is performed as an outpatient procedure, under local anesthesia.

Side effects of a prostate biopsy include:

Side effects are mild, and resolve completely within 2 weeks.

Continue to Cancer of the Prostate Psa Level

Last Updated: Jul 7, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Cancer of the Prostate References
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  4. Johns LE, Houlston RS. A systematic review and meta-analysis of familial prostate cancer risk. BJU Int. 2003 Jun;91(9):789-94. [12780833]
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