Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Broken Ankle Using a Walker

Elderly patients with an ankle fracture may require more support than a cane or crutches can offer.

A walker is much more stable than crutches or a cane. Adjust the walker so that the handles reach the crease in your wrist while you stand upright.

Using a Walker

  • Place your walker one stride ahead of you. Make sure that all 4 legs of your walker are on the ground.
  • Grasp the handles on the walker with both hands. Lean forward and support your weight on your arms.
  • Step forward with your good leg. Place your foot in the center of the square that is made by the walker feet.
  • Step forward with the other leg.

Walker Rules
  • Take small steps when you turn.
  • In order to sit in a chair, back up until your legs touch the chair. Reach behind you in order to feel the seat and then sit down.
  • In order to get up from a chair, push yourself up with your arms and then grasp the handles on the walker.
  • Make sure that the rubber tips on the legs of the walker are tightly fastened. Replace the rubber tips if they become worn.
  • Do not use your walker to climb stairs.
  • Do not use your walker on an escalator.

General Safety Tips
  • Remove small area rugs, electrical cords, spilled liquids or other items that may cause you to slip.
  • In the bathroom, install non-slip bath mats, toilet grab bars, a raised toilet seat, shower grab bars and a shower tub seat.
  • Keep household items in close reach.
  • Use a backpack, fanny pack, apron or shoulder bag to carry items.

Continue to Broken Ankle Using Crutches

Last Updated: Nov 3, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Broken Ankle References
  1. DiGiovanni BF, Partal G, Baumhauer JF. Acute ankle injury and chronic lateral instability in the athlete. Clin Sports Med. 2004 Jan;23(1):1-19, v. [15062581]
  2. Kunkel M, Miller SD. Return to work after foot and ankle injury. Foot Ankle Clin. 2002 Jun;7(2):421-8, viii. [12462119]
  3. McKay GD, Goldie PA, Payne WR, Oakes BW. Ankle injuries in basketball: injury rate and risk factors. Br J Sports Med. 2001 Apr;35(2):103-8.[11273971]
  4. Pugia ML, Middel CJ, Seward SW, Pollock JL, Hall RC, Lowe L, Mahony L, Henderson NE. Comparison of acute swelling and function in subjects with lateral ankle injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2001 Jul;31(7):384-8.[11451309]
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