Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Bacterial Pneumonia Staphylococcus Anatomy

To better understand staphylococcus pneumonia, it helps to understand the anatomy of the lungs.

Inside the chest, the windpipe, or trachea, divides into two smaller tubes: the right bronchus and the left bronchus. The right bronchus enters the right lung and the left bronchus enters the left lung. The right bronchus and left bronchus branch into smaller and smaller tubes.

The smallest tubes, called bronchioles, end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli. Blood flows very close to the walls of the alveoli. Oxygen and carbon dioxide pass between the air and the bloodstream through the wall of the alveoli.

Anatomy examples:

  • The lung and airways
  • The bronchioles and alveoli
  • The lungs

Last Updated: Nov 5, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Bacterial Pneumonia Staphylococcus References
  1. Anstead GM, Quinones-Nazario G, Lewis JS 2nd. Treatment of infections caused by resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Methods Mol Biol. 2007;391:227-58. [18025681]
  2. Ferrara AM. Treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2007 Jul;30(1):19-24. Epub 2007 May 1. [17475449]
  3. Maclayton DO, Hall RG 2nd. Pharmacologic treatment options for nosocomial pneumonia involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ann Pharmacother. 2007 Feb;41(2):235-44. Epub 2007 Feb 13. [17299012]
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