Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Bacterial Enteritis Overview

Another name for Bacterial Enteritis is Bacterial Gastroenteritis.

What is bacterial gastroenteritis?
A person with bacterial gastroenteritis has inflammation of the intestines or stomach caused by a bacterial infection. Most cases of bacterial gastroenteritis are caused by eating food that is contaminated by bacteria. Common causes of bacterial gastroenteritis include salmonella infection, shigella infection, cholera, Campylobacter enteritis, and pseudomembranous colitis.

What are the symptoms of bacterial gastroenteritis?
Common symptoms of bacterial gastroenteritis include cramping abdominal pain, fever, nausea and vomiting. Diarrhea is the most common symptom and stools may be watery, bloody, or contain yellow or green mucus.

How does the doctor treat bacterial gastroenteritis?
Treatment for bacterial gastroenteritis varies based on the species of bacteria. General treatment includes clear liquid diet, hydration, and fever control. Some may benefit from intravenous fluids and antibiotics.

Continue to Bacterial Enteritis Incidence

Last Updated: Aug 5, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Bacterial Enteritis References
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  2. Butzler JP. Campylobacter, from obscurity to celebrity. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2004 Oct;10(10):868-76. [15373879]
  3. Duggan C, Nurko S: "Feeding the gut": the scientific basis for continued enteral nutrition during acute diarrhea. J Pediatr 1997 Dec; 131(6): 801-8. [9427881]
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  5. Liebelt EL: Clinical and laboratory evaluation and management of children with vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. Curr Opin Pediatr 1998 Oct; 10(5): 461-9. [9818241]
  6. Wong CS, Jelacic S, Habeeb RL: The risk of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome after antibiotic treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. N Engl J Med 2000 Jun 29; 342(26): 1930-6. [10874060]
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