Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Asthma Anatomy

To better understand asthma, it helps to understand the anatomy of the lungs.

Inside the chest, the windpipe, or trachea, divides into two smaller tubes: the right bronchus and the left bronchus. The right bronchus enters the right lung and the left bronchus enters the left lung. The right bronchus and left bronchus branch into smaller and smaller tubes.

The smallest tubes, called bronchioles, end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli. Blood flows very close to the walls of the alveoli. Oxygen and carbon dioxide pass between the air and the bloodstream through the wall of the alveoli.

Anatomy examples:

  • The lung and airways
  • The bronchioles and alveoli
  • The lungs
  • Pulmonary vessels

Last Updated: Nov 3, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Asthma References
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  3. Keeley D, McKean M. Asthma and other wheezing disorders of childhood. Clin Evid. 2003 Jun;(9):287-317. [15366138]
  4. Neidell MJ. Air pollution, health, and socio-economic status: the effect of outdoor air quality on childhood asthma. J Health Econ. 2004 Nov;23(6):1209-36. [15556243]
  5. Rees J. ABC of asthma. Prevalence. BMJ. 2005 Aug 20;331(7514):443-5. [16110074]
  6. Vallance G, Thomson NC. Asthma: ten myths debunked. Practitioner. 2004 Nov;248(1664):844-7. [15543882]
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