Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

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Aortic Stenosis Pathophysiology

The principal problem with aortic stenosis is obstruction of blood flow. This usually does not occur to a significant degree in cases of AS due to idiopathic sclerosis.

People with rheumatic heart disease, or bicuspid valve, can develop symptoms of AS (most commonly) between the ages of 40 and 60. With an increase of obstruction to blood flow (through the stenotic valve), the heart attempts to compensate by enlarging. Eventually, the heart begins to decompensate and the patient will develop symptoms consistent with aortic stenosis.

Last Updated: Jun 2, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Aortic Stenosis References
  1. Boon NA, Bloomfield P.. The medical management of valvar heart disease. Heart. 2002 Apr;87(4):395-400. [11907022]
  2. Graham TP Jr, Driscoll DJ, Gersony WM, Newburger JW, Rocchini A, Towbin JA. Task Force 2: congenital heart disease. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Apr 19;45(8):1326-33. [15837282]
  3. Hughes BR, Chahoud G, Mehta JL. Aortic stenosis: is it simply a degenerative process or an active atherosclerotic process? Clin Cardiol. 2005 Mar;28(3):111-4. [15813615]
  4. Segal BL. Valvular heart disease, Part 1. Diagnosis and surgical management of aortic valve disease in older adults. Geriatrics. 2003 Sep;58(9):31-5. [14518175]
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