Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Angina Electrocardiogram

An electrocardiogram or ECG can be an effective tool in the evaluation of angina.

How an ECG Works
An electrical impulse stimulates the muscle fibers in the heart to contract. The impulse spreads through the heart in a very organized manner. The heart's normal electrical impulse has a characteristic pattern. The EKG machine displays the pattern of the electrical impulse.

Abnormal electrical patterns on the EKG can help identify heart disease.

The EKG can identify:

Continue to Angina Heart Catheterization

Last Updated: Jun 2, 2009 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Angina References
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  2. Brown TL, Merrill J, Hill P, Bengel FM. Relationship of coronary calcium and myocardial perfusion in individuals with chest pain. Assessed by integrated rubidium-82 PET-CT. Nuklearmedizin. 2008;47(6):255-260. [19057799]
  3. O'Toole L. Angina (stable). Clin Evid. 2005 Jun;(13):62-9. [16135259]
  4. Parker JO. Angina pectoris: a review of current and emerging therapies. Am J Manag Care. 2004 Oct;10(11 Suppl):S332-8. [15603242]
  5. Scheidt S. Treatment of stable angina: medical and invasive therapy--implications for the elderly. Am J Geriatr Cardiol. 2005 Jul-Aug;14(4):183-92. [16015059]
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