Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Overview Incidence Symptoms Evaluation Treatment specialist Home Care dietary fiber pain control warning signs Outlook Underlying Cause Anatomy

Anal Fistula Anatomy

To better understand anorectal fistula, it helps to understand the anatomy of the anus.

The anus is the opening on the gastrointestinal tract, where the stool exits. The anus marks the transition from the lining of the gastrointestinal tract to the external skin. The anal canal is a tube, 1-2 inches long that leads to the anus.

The anal canal is surrounded by circular muscles, called sphincters, and blood vessels. The sphincters control defecation.

Last Updated: Nov 1, 2008 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
Copyright DSHI Systems, Inc. Powered by: FreeMD - Your Virtual Doctor

PubMed Anal Fistula References
  1. Billingham RP, Isler JT, Kimmins MH, Nelson JM, Schweitzer J, Murphy MM. The diagnosis and management of common anorectal disorders. Curr Probl Surg. 2004 Jul;41(7):586-645. [15280816]
  2. Hyman N. Anorectal abscess and fistula. Prim Care. 1999 Mar;26(1):69-80. [9922295]
  3. Nunoo-Mensah JW, Balasubramaniam S, Wasserberg N, Artinyan A, Gonzalez-Ruiz C, Kaiser AM, Beart RW Jr, Vukasin P. Fistula-in-ano: do antibiotics make a difference? Int J Colorectal Dis. 2005 Aug 10;:1-3. [16091913]
FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for evaluation and treatment by a physician. Please review our terms of use.