Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Allergy Nasal Home Care

Home care for allergic rhinitis includes:

  • Avoid substances that trigger allergies.
    • Pollen exposure is the highest during the midday and afternoon.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Avoid exposure to secondary smoke.
  • Wash all bedding in hot water every week.
    • Including blankets, mattress pad and comforters
  • Do not hang clothes outside where they can be exposed to pollen.
  • Wash your hair before going to sleep:
    • Your hair can collect allergens during the day.
  • Take prescribed medications as directed:
    • Don't skip doses of your medication. This makes them less effective.
    • Be aware of the common side effects that may be caused by your medication.
  • Take oral antihistamines:
  • Decongestant medications:

Diphenhydramine Dosing Chart
AgeDoseIntervalMax Daily Dose
2-5 years6.25 mg4-6 hours37.5 mg/day
6-11 years12.5-25 mg4-6 hours150 mg/day
12 and older25-50 mg4-6 hours300 mg/day

Chlorpheniramine Dosing Chart
AgeDoseIntervalMax Daily Dose
Under 6consult your physician
6-11 years2 mg4-6 hours12 mg/day
12 and up4 mg4-6 hours24 mg/day

Allergy Nasal Congestion in Adults

Home treatment measures for congestion in a person with allergic rhinitis include general measures and medications. Medications include oral decongestants, decongestant nasal sprays and antihistamines.

General Measures

  • Blow your nose gently. Forceful blowing can cause pain and bleeding.
  • Apply petroleum jelly to the nostrils if the skin becomes dry.
  • Drink plenty of liquids.
  • Place a vaporizer or nebulizer in the bedroom at night.
  • Use saline (saltwater) nose spray, such as Ocean Nasal Mist: saline helps to keep the lining of nasal passages moist. Saline may be used to flush the nasal passages:
    • Lie on your back and tilt your head back.
    • Apply 2- 4 drops of saline in one on nostril, then wait 1 minute.
    • Blow your nose.
    • Repeat in the other nostril.

Oral Decongestants
Oral decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), help to thin the mucus responsible for the congestion. Decongestants are safe for adults and adolescents.

Decongestant precautions:

Decongestant Sprays
Decongestant nasal sprays, such as pseudoephedrine (Afrin) can relieve congestion faster than oral medications.

Examples include:
  • Afrin Nasal Spray
  • Duration Nasal Spray
  • Four-Way Fast Nasal Spray
  • Neo-Synephrine Nasal Spray
  • Vicks Sinex Nasal Spray

Precautions include:
  • Do not use decongestant nasal sprays for longer than 3 days. After three days, the nasal tissues become dependent on the medication. When the medication is stopped, the nasal tissue swells and congestion worsens.

Antihistamines
Antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) brompheniramine and chlorpheniramine, dry nasal tissue.

Examples include:

Antihistamine precautions:

Allergy Nasal Congestion in Children

Home treatment measures for congestion in children who have allergic rhinitis include general measures and medications. Medications include oral decongestants, decongestant nasal sprays and antihistamines.

General Measures

  • Ask your child to blow the nose gently. Forceful blowing can cause pain and bleeding.
  • Apply petroleum jelly to the nostrils if the skin becomes dry.
  • Drink plenty of liquids.
  • Place a vaporizer or nebulizer in the bedroom at night.
  • Use saline (saltwater) nose spray, such as Ocean Nasal Mist: saline helps to keep the lining of nasal passages moist.

Oral Decongestants
Oral decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), help to thin the mucus responsible for the congestion. Decongestants are safe for children more than 6 years old. Talk to your doctor before providing a decongestant to a child less than 6 years old.

Decongestant Sprays
Decongestant nasal sprays, such as pseudoephedrine (Afrin), can relieve congestion faster than oral medications, but should not be used in children less than 12 years old.

Examples include:
  • Afrin Nasal Spray
  • Duration Nasal Spray
  • Four-Way Fast Nasal Spray
  • Neo-Synephrine Nasal Spray
  • Vicks Sinex Nasal Spray

Precautions include:
  • Do not use decongestant nasal sprays for longer than 3 days. After three days, the nasal tissues become dependent on the medication. When the medication is stopped, the nasal tissue swells and congestion worsens.

Antihistamines
Antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) brompheniramine and chlorpheniramine, dry nasal tissue. Antihistamines are safe for children more than 5 years old. Talk to your doctor before providing an antihistamine to a child less than 5 years old.

Examples include:

Precautions include:

Diphenhydramine Dosing Chart
AgeDoseIntervalMax Daily Dose
2-5 years6.25 mg4-6 hours37.5 mg/day
6-11 years12.5-25 mg4-6 hours150 mg/day
12 and older25-50 mg4-6 hours300 mg/day

Chlorpheniramine Dosing Chart
AgeDoseIntervalMax Daily Dose
Under 6consult your physician
6-11 years2 mg4-6 hours12 mg/day
12 and up4 mg4-6 hours24 mg/day

Allergy Nasal Warning Signs

Notify your doctor if you have allergic rhinitis and any of the following:

Continue to Allergy Nasal Prevention

Last Updated: Nov 29, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
Copyright DSHI Systems, Inc. Powered by: FreeMD - Your Virtual Doctor

PubMed Allergy Nasal References
  1. Arshad SH. Primary prevention of asthma and allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Jul;116(1):3-14. [15990764]
  2. Busse WW: Mechanisms and advances in allergic diseases. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2000 Jun; 105(6 Pt 2): S593-8. [10856163]
  3. Meltzer EO, Szwarcberg J, Pill MW: Allergic rhinitis, asthma, and rhinosinusitis: diseases of the integrated airway. J Manag Care Pharm 2004 Jul-Aug; 10(4): 310-7. [15298529]
  4. Nielsen LP, Mygind N, Dahl R: Intranasal corticosteroids for allergic rhinitis: superior relief? Drugs 2001; 61(11): 1563-79. [11577794]
  5. Nimmagadda SR, Evans R 3rd: Allergy: etiology and epidemiology. Pediatr Rev 1999 Apr; 20(4): 111-5. [10208083]
  6. Veling MC, Trevino RJ: The treatment of allergic rhinitis with immunotherapy: a review of 1,000 cases. Ear Nose Throat J 2001 Aug; 80(8): 542-3. [11523472]
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