Stephen J. Schueler, M.D.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Stress

Tips to manage stress with HIV infection and AIDS:

  • Accept what you cannot change.
  • Allow yourself to cry.
  • Allow yourself to experience simple pleasures that give you joy.
  • Ask for help if you need it.
  • Associate with people you enjoy and who treat you well.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol.
  • Do not be dominated by one thing, such as work or relationships.
  • Do not feel guilty when you have to say "no" to extra duties or tasks.
  • Donate some of your time in order to help others.
  • Energize your body with regular exercise.
  • Engage in hobbies.
  • Fuel your body with healthy foods
  • Have the courage to be imperfect.
  • Make a list of all the stresses that cause you distress: dispose of the ones you can and reduce your exposure to the others as much as possible.
  • Practice relaxation and meditation.
  • Reevaluate and rearrange your priorities.
  • Schedule time for fun. Laughter dissolves tension.
  • Seek professional help when you are overwhelmed.
  • Stay on a regular sleep schedule.
  • Take a few minutes of quiet time each day.
  • Take responsibility for how you feel.
  • Talk with someone you trust.
  • Avoid stimulants, such as:

Continue to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Taking Control

Last Updated: Nov 16, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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PubMed Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome References
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